Indigenous Peoples’ Day Celebrated in the Pacific Northwest by Kalvin Valdillez, Tulalip News

In 2014, the Seattle City Council unanimously elected to replace the national holiday known as Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples Day, a holiday which celebrates Native American culture. It is no secret, in fact the atrocities committed by Christopher Columbus are well-documented. Continue reading

No, We Are Not “All” Indigenous by Matt Remle

In 2014, the cities of Seattle and Minneapolis launched a nationwide movement of cities, towns, counties and States passing Indigenous Peoples’ Day resolutions to replace the federal holiday, Columbus Day.

Prior to 2014, only the city of Berkeley had passed an Indigenous Peoples’ Day resolution having done so in 1992 on the 500 year anniversary of the Columbus voyage. Continue reading

NIEA Statement on Racial Incident in Reno, Nevada

On behalf of the National Indian Education Association (NIEA) the largest and oldest organization advocating for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian students, schools and communities, we write to express our deep concern and outrage at the recent assault and hate crime that was committed against the Reno Sparks Indian Colony, Nevada Tribes, and the community who were engaged in a peaceful rally and march to protest Columbus Day and calling for the city and state to replace this federal holiday to honor Indigenous People’s Day. Continue reading

1st anniversary of Indigenous Peoples’ Day celebrated*

Congress made the second Monday of October a federal holiday honoring Christopher Columbus in 1937.  To all Indigenous, Native, and Fist Nations people, the commemoration of the man responsible for initiating the European colonization of the Americas, which led to hundreds of years of disease, colonial rule and genocidal extermination following the Italian explorer’s accidental trip to the Americas, is just another reminder of the ‘social silence’ we have had to endure as a culture. Continue reading

Seattle Chooses Indigenous Peoples’ Day: the Story behind the Resolution

Last year, Seattle joined Minneapolis as the second major city to pass resolutions renaming the second Monday in October, the Federal holiday Columbus Day, to Indigenous Peoples’ Day.  Their resolutions, both of which were driven by the Native community, followed the passage of an Indigenous Peoples’ Day resolution in Berkeley, CA in 1992 and South Dakota’s passage of Native American Day in 1990.  Filmmaker Dallas Pinkham recently sat down with the organizers behind Seattle’s resolution for a look at how their efforts to establish Indigenous Peoples’ Day came to be. Continue reading