United States Supreme Court denies review in Indian Child Welfare Act case

The Protect ICWA Campaign — the National Indian Child Welfare Association, the National Congress of American Indians, the Association on American Indian Affairs, and the Native American Rights Fund — applauds the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to deny review in Carter v. Sweeney and protect Native children and families. Continue reading

Sea of red raises visibility on missing and murdered Indigenous women by Micheal Rios

“It is an honor to be here today. We raise our hands to the Tulalip Nation for welcoming us,” said Earth-Feather Sovereign (Colville Confederated Tribes). “We are here in honor of our missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, and all missing and murdered people, including two-spirits. We are here to bring community together and to hold a space for healing and awareness.” Continue reading

Navajo Nation to host Largest Indigenous Pride Parade

WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. – From June 28 to 29, the Navajo Nation gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer and two-spirit community will host the largest Indigenous Pride in the country in Window Rock, Arizona. To mark its 50th anniversary, all events will acknowledge and honor transgender women of color and the Stonewall riots that occurred in New York City. Continue reading

Washington State Attorney General Adopts a Free, Prior and Informed Consent Policy with Tribes

If we are to finally stop the endless bloodbath of war and imperialism, then holding accountable the governments and populaces of those same military powers when they wantonly abuse the human rights of the Indigenous Peoples in “their” home territories is the rational first step to creating a more humane world. So remember those letters: #FPIC, F-P-I-C. Those four powerful letters may be a key to the future of our species.” Fawn Sharp President of the Quinault Indian Nation Continue reading

Native Village Integrates Solar and Storage to Cut Costs, Displace Diesel

Despite the nearly half a million barrels of oil produced in Alaska each day, there’s no such thing as a “hometown discount.” Instead, some remote rural villages shell out as much as $1/kilowatt-hour (kWh) for diesel-generated electricity—more than eight times the national average. Continue reading