Indigenous Peoples Day: Together We Rise, Resist, Reclaim by Michael Rios

For the seventh consecutive year, the greater-Seattle area and its thousands of Native citizens will proudly celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day. Replacing the former misbegotten holiday dedicated to a slave trader and lost Italian navigator, the commemorative day to honor the past, present and future of Indigenous cultures takes place annually on the second Monday in October. Continue reading

Treaty Alliance First Nations Warn That There Will be No New Tar Sands Pipelines

August 11, 2017, Turtle Island – While the British Columbia provincial government yesterday was prohibiting Kinder Morgan from starting work on its Trans Mountain Expansion pipeline and tanker project on public land until First Nations rights are respected, Alberta Premier Rachel Notley was on site celebrating the start of construction of Enbridge’s “Line 3” project, a tar sands pipeline also mired in Indigenous opposition – including from the 150 First Nations and Tribes who have signed the Treaty Alliance Against Tar Sands Expansion. Continue reading

Buy Native! Support Native owned businesses

Across Turtle Island, Native entrepreneurs have been creating some of the most unique and innovative businesses and products. From clothing and fashion wear to health and beauty products these inspired Natives are opening the door to economic development for tribal communities. LRInspire highlights several Native businesses we all need to be supporting. Continue reading

1st anniversary of Indigenous Peoples’ Day celebrated*

Congress made the second Monday of October a federal holiday honoring Christopher Columbus in 1937.  To all Indigenous, Native, and Fist Nations people, the commemoration of the man responsible for initiating the European colonization of the Americas, which led to hundreds of years of disease, colonial rule and genocidal extermination following the Italian explorer’s accidental trip to the Americas, is just another reminder of the ‘social silence’ we have had to endure as a culture. Continue reading